Vineyards of En-Gedi | Homiletic Explorations into Communion, community, and evangelization
193
home,paged,page-template,page-template-blog-compound,page-template-blog-compound-php,page,page-id-193,paged-14,page-paged-14,ajax_updown_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode_grid_1300,qode-content-sidebar-responsive,transparent_content,qode-theme-ver-17.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.6,vc_responsive
  • The practical spirituality and ministry implied in the I Corinthians 5 reading is too much to pass up; the gospel story of the prodigal son provides a concrete example of what Paul is talking about for the Church. Reconciliation shows itself in the qualities of justice, joy, thanksgiving, humility, and wisdom. The joy in this Laeta...

  • Lent means to transform us into conformity with Christ in the flesh and in the resurrection. So the Lenten sojourner witnesses the transfiguration of Christ, and thus is enabled to enter into a deeper understanding of th Paschal Mystery for one’s self. Thus, a significant milestone in the Lenten walk with Jesus is attained. Lent ...

  • Human life is frail, given to the distractions of the world and subject to the whim of bad luck and needing to be set free from the oppression of the world’s domination. God appears to Moses and in the person of Jesus Christ to save us from slavery to sin and to accompany us in mercy on our own journey to Jerusalem. The readings ...

  • The gospel story is so well known and so many readers get fixated on whatever Jesus mysteriously wrote in the dust of the Temple pavement. Sometimes the main message of the personal encounter with Jesus is missed, but perhaps this is the binding link for the readings. If anything, the highlights of the Philippians reading are key t...

  • The readings challenge us to think about the dynamics and psychology of sin from the view of these ancient texts. Recognition of the truth of the human condition and authentic honesty about ourselves will result in an increase of yearning for Jesus. Sin is never comfortable to discuss, and yet it should not be in a “hell fire and...

  • The Ash Wednesday proclamation focused on prayer, fasting, and almsgiving, each the opposite of money, power, and fame. The gospel makes us consider the ways of the world as opposed to the ways of God. All God’s blessings belong to God; we return our money, power, fame and we praise God alone. How do these readings mature us in o...

  • Lectionary CatechesisFr. Alan Hartway, CPPS Guardian Angels Parish in Mead, CO Thus Lent begins. God desires conversion of heart; our Lenten practices are directed to that goal or end. At the same time, the three penances commended by Jesus are done for others who have less than we have ourselves; at any angle, penance has som...

  • The anointed one, foretold in Cyrus according to Isaiah, and fulfilled in Jesus Christ comes to save us through the trial of baptism, death to sin and an assent to God’s grace in the resurrection. The readings are about lamentation for the effects of sin; this is what Pope Francis means by a renewal of compunction, the gift of te...

Homiletics Notes / 11.02.2020

Love is on everyone's mind this week -- Valentine's Day and St. Josephine Bakhita (Saturday), surely an example of steadfast love as ever. Aquinas wrote that "love means to will the good of the other, purely and simply." This theme of love and the contests of wills runs right though the readings. Behind the words in the father's letter to his son in Sirach, is great love that knows we are chosen, protected, and called to higher life that keeps and builds up God commandments. The father and the Father are concerned for the welfare of their children. Why the choice of fire and water? In the classica world, it was on water that one swore oaths and proved one's innocense. The steady and sure hand held hovering at the water's surface suggests a lack of nervousness and steadiness; when the water is not sure but disturbed by a shaking hand, it was taken to show a lack of truth, fear, and unsteadiness in the words. Too chose fire meant destruction, because the hand would burn, and ban extension the person would be choosing the way of fire, which is the way of destruction/. ...

Homiletics Notes / 10.02.2020

021020 Ordinary Time 6 A The gospel, from the Sermon on the Mount, introduces the Law of Jesus alongside the Law of Moses. They are not counter poised. They are movement on a continuum for the disciples of Jesus into the knowledge of God which is eternal life. Jesus introduces the following sayings with his commentary on the Law: 1. He is fulfilling the law that will endure even in its smallest parts even of a single letter. 2. He speaks of righteousness, not something the individual achieves on their own, but as a pure gift from God. Here the Law is seen as gift which human society works together for the common good to fulfill the Law. Then follows six examples of Jesus' interpretation of the Law and his sayings to advance the Law. Six times he takes a significant Law by introduction and amplification. ?First, "you have heard that was said . . . " followed by "but I say to you . . . "He offers the Law, and its development in the reign of God. Only the first four of this pattern is in the Gospel this Sunday with the last two coming the very next Sunday OT 7 A. These last two are definitely the most challenging and difficult, especially the saying on revenge which is completely and totally misunderstood of all these sayings. Fulfilling the Law remains a huge concern for the Catholic today as we lapse in canonical laws to save or a deviant form of liturgical righteousness. Very few Cathoics would hold the notion of fulfilling the law by going down deeper into the fullest meaning of the Law. For example, the Catechism makes the longest commentary on the 7th Commandment -- "Thou shall not steal ." This includes a living wage for the poor as an act of justice, oetherwise we've stolen from the. The portion of the Catechism has many excellent example of stealing. ...

Homiletics Notes / 03.02.2020

Ordinary Time 5 A coming this weekend. The prophet Isaiah gives us in the first reading the corporal works of mercy. Too many Catholics today think that social justice was invented by Vatican II as a novelty. To say nothing of Leo XIII's Rerum Novarum, social justice is deeply embedded in the Law of Moses, and therefore has a long history in the Christian tradition. The early church was famous for taking care of the poor and needy; this is why St. Paul is always taking up collections. In the texts gathered in The Apostolic Fathers, the Didache and Ad Diognotus are particularly filled with admonitions about the poor. These corporal works of mercy even today is a summary of the social work of the church. The unexpected results of this mission is favor with God, yet in another sense, the effects of mission. In other words for Isaiah, favor with God is not found through Temple worship, but through the fulfillment of the law in justice. I realize that for many this is blasphemy, but we're still living in the Jansenistic world of "do ut des" religion, in which God answers our prayers without the need to do anything else. Prayers that do not result in acts of justice, in Isaiah's view, don't seem to add up too much. Of course, social justice makes religion much more difficult and challenging. The benefits of mercy are numerous in the reading, in fact make up most of the reading. They are graces from God as his justice toward us in the covenant, and we cannot do justice just because we expect God to bless us in return, as that corrupts the whole intent. The line in the text for today is "If you remove from your midst oppression, false accusation, and malicious speech," is quite apt for today in which truth is made false and the false made truth. ...